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Meet the 2019 Scribes Instructors: Samar Abulhassan and Greg Stump at The Henry Art Gallery

Posted Tue, 6/04/2019 - 9:47am by  |  Category: ,

Explore visual art and writing at Scribes at the Henry

We’re thrilled to partner with the Henry Art Gallery again for this year’s Scribes summer camps. Over the course of this two-week session, Scribes will write and explore the many exhibitions at the Gallery, including the first major solo show in the United States for Chilean-born artist Cicilia Vicuña, an exhibition featuring works from sculptor Beverly Semmes, and a survey of works from Carrie Yamaoka.

Scribes at the Henry is open to middle- and high school-age writers of all levels and runs August 5–16.

The session’s fearless leaders are returning Scribes instructors Samar Abulhassan and Greg Stump. Meet them and learn why they’re excited for this year’s camp below.


Samar Abulhassan

Quick! Favorite word, right now. 

Ramshackle.

A book or writer you wish you’d known about when you were 15 OR a book you wish had been around when you were 15:

Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being.

I knew I was going to be a writer when…

I won a poetry contest in fifth grade. I learned that I loved word play, and the fevered, speedy way sometimes language appeared, outsmarting me. 

Describe Scribes in five words.

Revelation, camaraderie, ink, deep fun

What are you most looking forward to about teaching at the Henry?

Right now, the Cecilia Vicuña exhibit at the Henry is stunningly wonderful. Also, I can’t read her words without pausing to make my own marks in notebooks, and I’m hopeful students will feel this way too!  


Greg Stump

Quick! Favorite word, right now. 

I don’t know that I have a favorite word, but “whopper” is both a fun one, and relevant to our times (as it relates to lies). 

A book or writer you wish you’d known about when you were 15 OR a book you wish had been around when you were 15:

I wish I had been able to read Joe Wenderoth’s Letters to Wendy’s when I was fifteen (although it wouldn’t even come into existence until several years later). It’s a favorite of mine in part because it’s so uncategorizable—it’s sort of poetry, sort of not, and seems almost like it’s written by a character that’s not the author, per se. I didn’t know that you could write such weird and funny stuff and have it be considered poetry, and I’m curious how it might have influenced my direction as a writer or a reader. 

What are you most looking forward to about teaching at the Henry?

I’m especially excited about using the collection at the Henry for writing prompts this summer. I think as a writer wrestling with a blank page staring back at you, it can sometimes feel like too much freedom—having something in front of you to look at and interrogate and wonder about can be liberating. 


Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing interviews with some of the 2019 Scribes instructors to learn more about their literary style and why they’re excited for this year’s camps. For more information on the camps and to register, visit the Scribes page.