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Class Catalog

Browse Fall & Winter Classes!

 

Click on the cover above to view the Winter print catalog as a PDF.

Hugo House: Your best source for writing classes in Seattle.

For more information on the schedule, scholarships, the various formats of our writing classes, and cancellation policies, check out our About page. Or, go meet our talented instructors.

If you would like to receive our quarterly catalogs in the mail, please contact us.


Winter Registration Dates

All registrations open at 10:30 am

$500+ donor Registration: November 26
Member Registration: November 27
General Registration: December 4


New! Early Bird Pricing November 26 through December 10:

  • $10 off one-session classes
  • $20 off classes that are two to six sessions
  • $35 off classes that are eight sessions or more

Early bird pricing will automatically apply at checkout. 

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Revising the Divine

All Levels | Whether or not we are believers, the ways God/the divine is rendered in language and image shapes us in profound but often hidden ways. We’ll give close readings to the work of poets who re-imagine and re-word…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Elizabeth Austen

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Start Date: 02/16/2019 – 1:00 PM

Elizabeth Austen

Former Washington state poet laureate Elizabeth Austen is the author of two chapbooks and a full-length collection, Every Dress a Decision (Blue Begonia, 2011), now in its fourth printing. She’s been a poetry correspondent for NPR affiliate KUOW since 2000, and leads poetry and reflective writing workshops for healthcare providers as a tool for self-care. In 2018 Elizabeth celebrated World Poetry Day at UNESCO in Paris, reading alongside a dozen poets from around the world. She earned an MFA from Antioch University-Los Angeles, and is an alumna of the Jack Straw Writers program and Hedgebrook. Elizabeth is working on a new manuscript, currently titled States of Emergency.

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Rule #1: Never Be Boring (There are no other rules.)

All Levels | There is no rule to writing great fiction and creative nonfiction except to “never be boring.” Also, please try not to be confusing or vague about important information. We’ll focus on compelling openings of stories, essays, memoirs,…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Peter Mountford

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Start Date: 02/16/2019 – 1:00 PM

Peter Mountford

Peter Mountford’s novel A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism won a 2012 Washington State Book Award. His second novel, The Dismal Science, was published in February, 2014. A former Hugo House writer in residence, Peter is currently on faculty at Sierra Nevada College's low residency MFA program.

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Graphic Novel Memoir

All Levels | A personal story gains added visceral power when told in comics form. Two experienced graphic novelists will guide you through the process of creating several short comics, leading up to a finished autobiographical story. We’ll look at…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: David Lasky, Greg Stump

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Start Date: 02/16/2019 – 1:00 PM

David Lasky, Greg Stump

David Lasky has been a published comics artist since 1989. His earliest success was a nine page mini-adaptation of James Joyce’s Ulysses (self-published), which was reviewed in the Washington Post’s “Bookworld” section in 1992. In the 90’s he became known for the solo comic Boom Boom, and then collaborated with Greg Stump on the Harvey-nominated Urban Hipster. His stories have appeared in countless anthologies over the years, including Kramers Ergot and Best American Comics. He has been an integral part of the Seattle comics scene, working at Fantagraphics in the late 90’s, volunteering at ZAPP, being a part of cartoonists groups such as Friends of the Nib, and contributing to The Intruder. David was also an early contributor to The Stranger, and as a freelancer has continued to create comics and illustrations for the weekly paper for over 20 years. With writer Frank Young, he co-created two graphic novels: Oregon Trail: Road to Destiny and The Carter Family: Don’t Forget This Song (Abrams). Carter Family won an Eisner Award (the comics industry’s equivalent to the Oscar) in 2013, in the category of Best Reality-Based Graphic Novel.
David has also been a graphic novel instructor at Richard Hugo House and various other venues in the Seattle area. Through Arts Corps, he taught after-school classes to elementary school students from 2008 to 2014. In 2013, he represented the United States at comics festivals in Serbia and Russia.

Teaching Philosophy: Creating comics is a powerful communication skill that anyone can learn, no matter their drawing ability.

Writers I return to: Art Spiegelman, Robert Crumb, Stacey Levine, James Joyce.

Favorite writing advice: Don't wait to get permission from anyone to create, just do it. You'll figure things out as you go.

Greg Stump was a regular contributor for more than a decade to The Comics Journal (as a journalist and critic) and The Stranger (as a cartoonist and illustrator). His work in comics includes the weekly strip Dwarf Attack and the comic book series Urban Hipster, a co-creation with David Lasky that was nominated for a Harvey and Ignatz award. Most recently, Fantagraphics released his graphic novel debut Disillusioned Illusions in 2015 through the publisher's FU Press imprint. An adjunct lecturer at Seattle University and a writer-in-residence for Seattle Arts & Lectures, he has been teaching comics to students of all ages for close to two decades.

Past Student Feedback:
"I thought both David and Greg were awesome instructors. They made it a fun class."

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The Mother in Laura Jensen’s & James Tate’s Poetry

All Levels | The mother as a totemic figure, and the complexity of the mother/child relationship, is the focus of several of Laura Jensen’s and James Tate’s fine poems, often to devastating effect. Melancholic, affectionate, blistering, and loving, their poems…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: J.W. Marshall

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Start Date: 02/20/2019 – 7:10 PM

J.W. Marshall

J.W. Marshall founded and ran Open Books, the poetry-only bookstore in Seattle, from 1995 until 2016. His poetry has appeared most recently in the webzine A Dozen Nothing and in Poetry Northwest and Hubbub. Seattle Review of Books published his appreciation of the poet Lucia Perillo. His collection, Meaning a Cloud, won the Field Poetry Prize and his chapbook, Blue Mouth, was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. He holds an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and an M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling from Seattle University. He is the publisher of letterset broadsides for Function Press and letterset chapbooks for Cash Machine.

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Epistolary Prose

All Levels | Even in our age of digital communication, the letter holds enormous power for both writer and reader. We will look at prose aimed at a wider audience but crafted as a letter (work by Chris Kraus, Marilynne…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Liza Birnbaum

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Start Date: 02/21/2019 – 7:10 PM

Liza Birnbaum

Liza Birnbaum's fiction and essays have appeared in Web Conjunctions, jubilat, Open Letters Monthly, and other publications. She is a founding editor of Big Big Wednesday, an annual print journal of literature and visual art, and has taught creative writing in a number of settings, most recently at an alternative school for young women who are pregnant or parenting. In 2019, she will be a funded resident at the Lillian E. Smith Center at Piedmont College. She holds an MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

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Memoir Four Ways

What is it about the genre of memoir that we find so thrilling, so intriguing and yet, so oft scandalized and difficult to accept as the legitimate sister to fiction in the literary cannon? How many ways can memoir be…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Sophia Shalmiyev

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Start Date: 02/22/2019 – 10:00:00
5 seats available

Sophia Shalmiyev

Sophia Shalmiyev emigrated from Leningrad in 1990. She is an MFA graduate of Portland State University with a second master's degree in creative arts therapy from the School of Visual Arts. She lives in Portland with her two children. Mother Winter is her first book.

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The Art of Storytelling

Intemediate | To learn to weave dialogue, narrative, and action into a well-paced story is to craft a work of art. You can learn the techniques if you’re listening carefully to your story’s voice and willing to work to find…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Gloria Kempton

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Start Date: 02/23/2019 – 1:00 PM
5 seats available

Gloria Kempton

Gloria Kempton is an author, writing coach and former magazine and book editor. She is the author of eleven books, including Write Great Fiction: Dialogue and The Outlaw’s Journey; A Mythological Approach to Storytelling for Writers Behind Bars. She’s a former contributing editor to Writer’s Digest magazine and an instructor with their online writing courses: writersonlineworkshops.com. She also teaches online at writers.com and to incarcerated writers at the Regional Justice Center in Kent, WA.

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Revising and Submitting the Short Story

Intermediate/Advanced | We will explore how to take a short story manuscript and make it publication-ready. In addition to workshop, the course will address a range of questions that typically arise during revision. Where does the story start? What is…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Becky Mandelbaum

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Start Date: 02/24/2019 – 1:00 PM
This class is full

Becky Mandelbaum

Becky Mandelbaum is the author of Bad Kansas (University of Georgia Press, 2017), which received the 2016 Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction and is a finalist for the 2018 High Plains Book Award for First Book. Her work has appeared in The Missouri Review, The Georgia Review, Electric Lit, The Rumpus, Necessary Fiction, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and elsewhere. Originally from Kansas, she currently lives in Washington’s Skagit Valley.

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Writing and Fear

All Levels | Drawing from Art and Fear (Bayles, Orland) and Your Art Will Save Your Life (Pickens), we will examine our work patterns, challenges, goals, and fears through free-writing and discussion. What is your relationship to your writing? How…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Anne Liu Kellor

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Start Date: 02/24/2019 – 1:00 PM
This class is full

Anne Liu Kellor

Anne Liu Kellor has received support from Hedgebrook, 4Culture, and Jack Straw, and taught creative nonfiction since 2006. Her essays have appeared in publications such as Waking Up American (Seal Press) and the Los Angeles Review.

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Writing Critical Essays and Reviews

Intermediate | As the saying goes, everyone’s a critic. Or are they? Students interested in criticism—literary, music, cultural—will explore the art of critical writing by reading the work of others and producing their own writing. Class work will include discussing…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Kevin O'Rourke

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Start Date: 02/25/2019 – 7:10 PM

Kevin O'Rourke

Kevin O’Rourke lives in Seattle, where he works in publishing. His first book, the essay collection As If Seen at an Angle, was published by Tinderbox Editions.

A member of the National Book Critics Circle, he is an active literary and arts critic. Publications where his criticism has appeared include Ploughshares, the Kenyon Review, and Michigan Quarterly Review, where he is a regular contributor. His work is currently supported by a grant from 4Culture.

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Pitch Like a Pro

Introductory / Intermediate | Tired of rejections or too afraid to even try pitching? Learn how to convince a magazine or online editor that you have the right idea at the right time and are the right writer for the…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Lora Shinn

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Start Date: 02/25/2019 – 7:10 PM

Lora Shinn

Lora Shinn is currently interim editor at Alaska Airlines Beyond, and has written about travel for publications including Sunset, AFAR, National Geographic Traveler, AAA Journey and New York Magazine.

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When Memoir Meets Poetry

All Levels | In this class we’ll tell two truths and a lie to create a hybrid genre. We’ll pick a section of our past or present life and shrink it down just enough to stay within 30 pages and…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Anastacia Renee

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Start Date: 02/25/2019 – 7:10 PM
This class is full

Anastacia Renee

Anastacia-Renee is Civic Poet of Seattle and former 2015-17 poet-in-residence at Hugo House. She is a hybrid genre writer, workshop facilitator, and multivalent performance artist. She is the author of four books: Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.) (Gramma Press), Answer(Me) (Argus Press), and 26 (Dancing Girl Press). Her poetry, prose, and fiction are published widely.

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Finding Your Authority in Nonfiction

All Levels | Examine strategies writers use to maintain authority while not-knowing, and how this essential risk can lead to greater vulnerability, complexity, and artistic surprise. We’ll read Yiyun Li, Brian Blanchfield, and Elissa Washuta, and study the ways they…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Kate Lebo

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Start Date: 02/26/2019 – 5:00 PM
This class is full

Kate Lebo

Kate Lebo’s writing is anthologized in Best American Essays 2015 and her first collection of nonfiction, The Book of Difficult Fruit, is forthcoming from FSG. She’s the author of Pie School and co-editor (with Samuel Ligon) of Pie & Whiskey.

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Shapes of Stories

All Levels | The shape of a story is more than just the way it is told—changing the shape changes the story. We’ll explore popular shapes for stories including braids, collage, the traditional narrative arc, the circle, and the frame…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Waverly Fitzgerald

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Start Date: 02/28/2019 – 7:10 PM
1 seats available

Waverly Fitzgerald

Waverly Fitzgerald loves research as much as writing, which is sometimes a problem. She has written one non-fiction book, Slow Time (2007) and fourteen novels, of which nine have been published by publishers as diverse as Doubleday and Kensington. Her essays and poems have appeared in Facere and Raven Chronicles. For her essays on urban nature, she has been awarded a fellowship from Jack Straw Cultural Center, a grant from Artist Trust and residences at Hedgebrook and the Whiteley Center. She has presented at international and national writing conferences and taught for various continuing education programs including the UCLA Writers Program and the University of Washington Extension. She currently teaches online for Creative Nonfiction magazine.

Teaching philosophy: My only goal as a teacher is to make sure my students learn what they want to learn. So I provide accountability, offer feedback and encourage writing. I set up interesting situations where writers can practice either craft skills or generate new material on subjects of their own choosing. Although I bring in examples of writing from other writers, I encourage students to choose their own models. I’m as open to genre writing as I am to literary writing. Having found the workshop model of teaching (critique from the entire group of one manuscript at time) both inefficient and sometimes damaging, I rarely use it though I do encourage camaraderie in the classroom because second to writing I think participating in a writing community is an ingredient necessary for writerly success.

Writers I return to: Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Goudge, Anthony Trollope, William Lashner, Timothy Hallinan, Susan Howatch, Dorothy Dunnett, Ellis Peters, Jorge Amado, D. J. Waldie, Robert MacFarlane, Jay Griffiths, Rebecca Solnit, Lia Purpura.

Favorite writing advice: Consider the reader.

Photo by Brian Weiss

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How the Body Holds Its Stories

All Levels | How do our bodies hold onto experiences? How do generations of people of color, queer and trans people, and others who have experienced marginalization carry those stories over generations? This free workshop is for anyone who has ever felt…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Jordan Alam

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Start Date: 03/02/2019 – 13:00:00
This class is full

Jordan Alam

Jordan Alam is a queer Bangladeshi-American writer, performer, and social change educator based out of Seattle. Her work engages with moments of rupture and transformation in the lives of people on the margins. Jordan’s work is heavily engaged in community and she is a current Kundiman Pacific Northwest co-chair and 4Culture Artist Grant recipient. Her short stories and articles have appeared in The Atlantic, CultureStrike Magazine, The Rumpus, and AAWW’s The Margins; she has spoken at events including the Aspen Ideas Festival and the Eyes on Bangladesh exhibition. She is also the founder of the Asian American social justice publication, Project As[I]Am (http://www.project-as-i-am.com). Most recently, she has completed a fellowship with Town Hall Seattle to create collaborative performance pieces about stories of the body and been editing a draft of her debut novel. See more of her work at her website: www.jordanalam.com

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