Classes

Nonfiction

  • Term: Fall 2022
  • Start Date: November 6, 2022
  • End Date: December 11, 2022
  • Day of Week: Sunday
  • Time: 1:10pm - 3:10pm
  • Level: Intermediate
  • Audience: Adult
  • Location: Online
  • Availability: Yes
  • Public Price: $305.00
  • Member Price: $274.50

Learn About Scholarships

Writing About Nature

Taking cues from writers such as J. Drew Lanham, Ana Maria Spagna, Rick Bass, and Aimee Nezhukumatathil, we'll read and write essays with a nature and environmental focus. Through reading, discussion, and writing practice, we'll explore literary tools along with research methods such as personal observation and interviews. Every writer will compose a place-based essay integrating narrative and information. We'll share these essays in a supportive workshop setting.

Registration dates:

August 22: Scholarship Donation Day (Learn more.)

August 23: Member registration opens

August 30: General registration opens

Gail Folkins

Gail Folkins

she/her

Gail Folkins often writes about her deep roots in the American West. She is the author of two creative nonfiction books from Texas Tech University Press: a Pacific Northwest memoir titled Light in the Trees (2016), and Texas Dance Halls: A Two-Step Circuit (2007), which was a popular culture finalist in ForeWord Review’s 2007 Book of the Year Awards. Folkins’ essay “A Palouse Horse” was a Notable Essay in The Best American Essays 2010. Her essays and poetry have appeared in publications such as River Teeth Journal – Beautiful Things, North Dakota Quarterly, Wisconsin Life, Texas Highways, and Wildflower Magazine. She has taught at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, St. Edward’s University (Austin), and Austin Community College.

Teaching philosophy: My goal is to further understanding of craft while also encouraging expression of students’ unique voices. Students have praised my workshop format and student-centered approach. Students learn to not only share a narrative, but to also explore their experiences and discoveries. I encourage students to read as writers, meaning focusing on elements of craft in addition to literary themes.

Writers I return to: Edward Abbey, Julia Alvarez, Margaret Atwood, Kim Barnes, Rick Bass, Dennis Covington, Louise Erdrich, Ernest Hemingway, Pico Iyer, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Favorite writing advice: Find the extraordinary in the everyday.