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Class Catalog

Browse Spring Classes!

Hugo House: Your best source for writing classes in Seattle.

For more information on the schedule, scholarships, the various formats of our writing classes, and cancellation policies, check out our About page. Or, go meet our talented instructors.

For help finding classes, contact our registrar or call us at 206.322.7030.

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Spring Registration Dates

All registrations open at 10:30 am

$500+ donor Registration: March 2
Member Registration: March 3
General Registration: March 10


Early Bird Pricing March 2 through March 16:

  • $10 off one-session classes
  • $20 off classes that are two to six sessions
  • $35 off classes that are eight sessions or more

Early bird pricing will automatically apply at checkout. 

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Online Class | #OwnVoices: Digital Storytelling

All Levels | Digital storytelling—the single or combined use of text, images, video, audio, social media (like ‘tweets’ or ‘bookstagrams’), or interactive elements (such as live chats)—is a powerful way to showcase diverse narratives. This course will focus on how…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Rachel Werner

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Start Date: 02/27/2020

Rachel Werner

Rachel Werner is the Content Marketing Specialist for Taliesin Preservation—a National Historic Landmark and the home, studio, school and 800-acre estate of Frank Lloyd Wright. She is also guest faculty at The Highlights Foundation; a 2018 We Need Diverse Books mentorship finalist; and a 2017 World Food Championship judge. Formerly the digital editor at BRAVA (a Wisconsin-based publication created by women for women), she enjoyed overseeing culinary, arts, style and live event coverage while working in the media in addition to contributing print, photography and video content to BLK+GRN, Madison Magazine, Entrepreneurial Chef, Hobby Farms Magazine and Urban Farm. She is equally grateful to have presented this year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Writer's Institute and Write to Publish at Portland State University on digital marketing and social media strategy for writers.

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The Tools of Voice

One of the most effective ways in prose to, as Susan Sontag says, “preserve the works of the mind against oblivion,” is to craft a distinctive voice. Voice is made up of qualities that include diction and structural choices, syntactical…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Mitchell S. Jackson

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Start Date: 02/28/2020 – 12:00 pm
This class is full

Mitchell S. Jackson

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years (Bloomsbury) received wide critical praise. Jackson is the winner of a Whiting Award. His novel also won The Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence and was a finalist for The Center for Fiction Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, the PEN / Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction, and the Hurston / Wright Legacy Award. Jackson’s honors include fellowships from the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center, the Lannan Foundation, the Ford Foundation, PEN America, TED, NYFA (New York Foundation for the Arts), and The Center for Fiction. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Harpers, The New York Times Book Review, The Paris Review, The Guardian, Time Magazine, and elsewhere. His nonfiction book Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family (Scribner) was published in the spring of 2019. He is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Chicago.
Jackson is also a well-regarded speaker who has delivered lectures and keynote addresses at events including the annual TED Conference, the Ubud (Bali) Writers and Readers Festival, and the Sydney Writers’ Festival, as well as institutions including Yale University, Brown University, Cornell University, and Columbia University. A formerly incarcerated person, Jackson is also a l justice advocate who, as part of his efforts, visits prisons and youth facilities in the United States and abroad.

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The Path to Story

Over this two-day generative workshop with Jarhead author Anthony Swofford, you will read the first pages of a number of fiction and nonfiction works and discuss “the path” into the works for the reader and the writer. With a series…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Anthony Swofford

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Start Date: 02/29/2020 – 10:00 am

Anthony Swofford

Anthony Swofford is the author of the memoirs Jarhead and Hotels, Hospitals, and Jails and the novel Exit A. Swofford’s essays, reportage, and opinion pieces have appeared in Harper’s, The Guardian, Slate, and the New York Times, among other places. He has taught at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and West Virginia University. He received his fiction MFA from Iowa. In 2020 Knopf will publish his biography of Carlos Arredondo, a Gold Star Father and hero of the 2013 marathon bombing in Boston. He’s currently writing a feature adaptation of this book. His next prose project is a campus novel called Eight Great Atheists. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, the writer and photographer Christa Parravani, their three children, a fish with a host of names, a dog named Kingsley Exley Lizard, and nearby coyotes.

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From Start to Finish: Get to a Draft in One Day

All Levels | In this generative workshop, you’ll learn to cultivate deadline discipline with a series of timed prompts based on Anzaldúa’s “How to Tame a Wild Tongue” applicable to both fiction and creative nonfiction. Together, we will create new…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Kristen Millares Young

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Start Date: 03/01/2020 – 10:00 am
This class is full

Kristen Millares Young

Kristen Millares Young is the author of Subduction, a novel forthcoming from Red Hen Press on April 14, 2020. A prize-winning investigative journalist, book critic and essayist, Kristen serves as the 2018-2020 Prose Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House. Her work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Guardian, the New York Times, Poetry Northwest, Crosscut, Hobart, Moss, Proximity, Seattle’s Child, Pacifica Literary Review, KUOW 94.9-FM, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the Miami Herald, the Buenos Aires Herald and TIME Magazine. Her personal essays are anthologized in Pie & Whiskey, a 2017 New York Times New & Notable Book, Latina Outsiders: Remaking Latina Identity and Advanced Creative Nonfiction: A Writer's Guide and Anthology (Bloomsbury of New York and London, 2021).

Kristen was the researcher for the New York Times team that produced “Snow Fall,” which won a Pulitzer and a Peabody in 2013. Her stories have been recognized by the Society for Features Journalism, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Kristen has been a fellow at UC Berkeley’s Knight Digital Media Center, the Jack Straw Writing Program, and the University of Washington Graduate School, where she was a Graduate Opportunities and Minority Achievement Scholar.

Kristen graduated magna cum laude from Harvard with a 2003 degree in History and Literature, earning her Master of Fine Arts from the University of Washington in 2012. She teaches creative writing in English and Spanish at Hugo House, the University of Washington Continuum College, the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference and the Seattle Public Library. Kristen serves as board chair of InvestigateWest, a nonprofit news studio she co-founded in 2009. InvestigateWest’s reporting has led to the passage of fifteen new laws to improve the environment and the lives of foster families, people of color caught in the criminal justice system, health care workers, and advocates for government transparency.

Teaching philosophy: What do powerful writers know? They know that personal experience – each human being’s subjective perception of the world – is the single largest factor for determining how that person views the world. What do powerful writers do? They take their lived experience and, using both recollection and imagination, transform it into words that compel others to feel what the author has found and portrayed. What do powerful writers discover through careful examination of their work? They learn that their characters and plots often reach for epiphanies unfounded by the scenes provided in their narratives. That recognition compels writers to seek revelations from other sources, whether readings or workshop commentary, and to revise their work, again and again. In revision awaits transformation. Why does writing matter? Writing teaches us to understand the world around us. In turn, it helps us to be understood by others. There can be no greater hope.

Writers I return to: Come to my class. We’ll get into all of that and more. Or you can take the easy way out and check out my instagram @kristenmillares, where I post the covers of favored books.

Favorite writing advice: Ass in chair.

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Writing Home

All Levels | Home can be where we learn to first understand our place in the world, and a place we return to again and again for answers about how to be. Looking at several example essays by writers like…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Margot Kahn Case

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Start Date: 03/02/2020 – 5:00 pm
1 seats available

Margot Kahn Case

Margot Kahn is the author of the biography Horses That Buck, winner of the High Plains Best First Book Award, and co-editor of This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home, a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. Her essays and reviews have appeared in The Rumpus, Lenny Letter, The Los Angeles Review, BUST, and Publishers Weekly, among other places, and her poems have appeared in numerous journals. She earned an MFA from Columbia University and has been supported by the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, 4Culture and ArtistTrust. She is currently at work on a new biography and co-editing the forthcoming collection Wanting: Women Writing About Desire.

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True Stories, Real People: When Your ‘Characters’ Know Where You Live

Introductory / Intermediate | How do you bring nonfiction subjects to life without getting sued — or stabbed? This class will cover the challenges and thrills of writing about real human beings — public figures, dead people, friends, and trickiest…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Neal Thompson

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Start Date: 03/05/2020 – 5:00 pm

Neal Thompson

Neal Thompson is the author of five books, most recently the memoir, Kickflip Boys (Ecco, 2018). A former newspaper reporter, Neal's journalism has appeared in Esquire, Outside, and the Wall Street Journal, among many other publications. He's writing a book about the Irish immigrant Kennedys. He lives in Seattle with his family.

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The Written and Then Spoken Word

All Levels | Should all poems be read aloud? Yes, indeed. Creating that credible voice — a poem that comes alive on the page as well from the mouth — is the goal of this workshop. Using innovated prompts, participants…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Gary Copeland Lilley

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 1:00 pm
4 seats available

Gary Copeland Lilley

Gary Copeland Lilley is the author of eight books of poetry, the most recent being The Bushman's Medicine Show, from Lost Horse Press (2017), and a chapbook, The Hog Killing, from Blue Horse Press (2018). He is originally from North Carolina and now lives in the Pacific Northwest. He has received the Washington DC Commission on the Arts Fellowship for Poetry. He is published in numerous anthologies and journals, including Best American Poetry 2014, Willow Springs, The Swamp, Waxwing, the Taos International Journal of Poetry, and the African American Review. He is a Cave Canem Fellow.

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Truth or Fiction?: Writing Life Stories

Introductory / Intermediate | Writing about real life can be tricky. You may not remember all the details—or, you may want to change information to protect people or make a story more interesting. But how much is OK to change?…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Susan Meyers

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 1:00 pm

Susan Meyers

Susan V. Meyers has lived and taught in Chile, Costa Rica, and Mexico. She earned an MFA from the University of Minnesota and a PhD from the University of Arizona, and she currently directs the Creative Writing Program at Seattle University. Her fiction and nonfiction have been supported by grants from the Fulbright foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, 4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, as well as several artists residencies. Her novel Failing the Trapeze won the Nilsen Award for a First Novel and the Fiction Attic Press Award for a First Novel, and it was a finalist for the New American Fiction Award. Other work has recently appeared in Per Contra, Calyx, Dogwood, The Portland Review, and The Minnesota Review, and it has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

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The Title as Frame and Invitation Section II

All Levels | Where do great poem titles come from? What makes a title “great,” anyway? Through reading and discussing example poems by Angel Nafis, Alice Oswald, Lucille Clifton, Thomas Lux and others, we’ll explore this essential and too-often overlooked…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Elizabeth Austen

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 10:00 am

Elizabeth Austen

Elizabeth Austen traveled the state as Washington’s poet laureate for 2014-16, and is the author of Every Dress a Decision, which was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award and is now in its fourth printing. New poems are forthcoming in New England Review and Spirited Stone: Lessons from Kubota’s Garden. She earned an MFA in Creative Writing - Poetry at Antioch University Los Angeles, and is an alumna of Hedgebrook and the Jack Straw Writers program.

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Searching for Your Romance Voice and Style

All Levels | What’s the difference between a romantic story that grabs your imagination and one that puts you to sleep? The voice — so let’s go on a voice hunt. We’ll examine well-known romances and authors to figure out…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Eilis Flynn

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 10:00 am

Eilis Flynn

Over the years, Elizabeth Flynn, who writes as Eilis Flynn, has written fiction in the form of comic book stories, fantasies (romantic, urban, and historical), and short stories. She’s also a professional editor and has been for 40-some years, working with academia, technology, finance, genre fiction, and comic books. She can be reached at emsflynn.com (if you’re looking for an editor) or at eilisflynn.com (if you’re looking for a good read).

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More than Memories: Making Meaning in Memoir

Memories aren’t enough. We have to connect them to culture, to history, to zeitgeist—and then be as clear and specific about our unique perspectives as possible. In this generative workshop, we’ll open a number of creative doorways (and windows and…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Kimberly Dark

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 10:00 am

Kimberly Dark

Kimberly Dark is the author of Fat, Pretty and Soon to be Old, The Daddies and Love and Errors. Her essays, stories and poetry are widely published in academic and popular online publications alike.

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Deep Wordplay

All Levels | By stripping language of its meaning, creating words, and focusing on sounds, shapes, and pleasure, this is an opportunity to step away from purpose and instead experience the joy of words for their own sake. We’ll find…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Erica Sklar

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Start Date: 03/07/2020 – 10:00 am

Erica Sklar

Erica Sklar writes, organizes, and scouts out wildlife around Seattle. You can find her and subscribe to her newsletter on Twitter @_sklarface_

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Narrative Intimacy in Literary Nonfiction

All Levels | A recent New York Times article refers to a new wave of memoirs drawing on the intimate. While intimacy of voice in narrative nonfiction is not new, readers continue to seek deep human connection through books. Together,…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Sarah Townsend

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Start Date: 03/10/2020 – 7:10 pm
5 seats available

Sarah Townsend

Sarah Townsend is the author of Setting the Wire: A Memoir of Postpartum Psychosis (The Lettered Streets Press, 2019). Her essays have appeared in The Writer in the World and Pitkin Review, and a coauthored paper with Elisabeth Young-Bruehl serves as a chapter in Subject to Biography: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Writing Women’s Lives. Sarah received her MFA in creative writing from Goddard College, her MA in counseling psychology from Northwestern University, and is a graduate of the College of Letters at Wesleyan University. Setting the Wire has been featured on Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton, The Ish with Cameron Dezen Hammon, and in the Chicago Review of Books. You can learn more about her at SarahTownsendWriter.com.

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Researching and Writing True Crime

Introductory | No matter when the crime in question took place, crime-writing is different than any other genre. It requires digging for documents, finding sources, conducting sensitive interviews, being at the scene of the crime, and researching cold cases. This…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Rebecca Morris

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Start Date: 03/11/2020 – 7:10 pm

Rebecca Morris

New York Times bestselling author Rebecca Morris is also a veteran journalist who worked in radio and television news in New York City; Portland, Oregon; and Seattle, Washington and was a free-lance writer for The Seattle Times, The Oregonian, People, Entertainment Weekly, and many other publications before she began writing true crime books.

Her first book, Ted and Ann, continues to be an e-book bestseller on Amazon (and is also available in paperback), and her e-book, Bad Apples – Inside the Teacher/Student Sex Scandal Epidemic, is the only book to look at the trend of female teachers having sex with underage students.

She is the author of A Murder in My Hometown (2018), A Killing in Amish Country - Sex Betrayal and a Cold-Blooded Murder (St. Martin's, 2016) and If I Can't Have You - Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance and the Murder of Her Children (St. Martin's 2014) with bestselling author Gregg Olsen. They are also the authors of the Notorious USA series, including The Boy Who Fired the First Shot, The Girl and the Horrors of Howard Ave., and The Stranger and the World’s Bravest Little Girl.

Rebecca attended Oregon State University, received a B.A. in Journalism from Seattle University, and has an M.F.A. in Playwriting from Brown University. She speaks about her work at libraries, schools, and writers’ conferences. She has taught writing, journalism, and playwriting at colleges and universities across the country. She lives in Seattle.

She appears frequently on television as a crime expert.

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Alternative Structures, Familiar Patterns

DATE CHANGE: This class will now start on 3/11 and is 4 sessions long. This has been updated from the print catalog.  Intermediate | Each piece we set out to write presents endless choices and decisions. By studying the structures…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Diana Xin

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Start Date: 03/11/2020 – 7:10 pm

Diana Xin

Diana Xin holds an MFA from the University of Montana. Her fiction has appeared in Gulf Coast, Narrative, Alaska Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. Most recently, she was named winner of Third Coast Magazine's 2017 fiction contest. She is a contributing editor to Moss Lit and a 2015 recipient of the Made at Hugo House fellowship.

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