fbpx

Class Catalog

Browse Winter Classes!

Hugo House: Your best source for writing classes in Seattle.

For more information on the schedule, scholarships, the various formats of our writing classes, and cancellation policies, check out our About page. Or, go meet our talented instructors.

For help finding classes, contact our registrar or call us at 206.322.7030.

If you would like to receive our quarterly catalogs in the mail, please contact us.


Winter Registration Dates

All registrations open at 10:30 am

$500+ donor Registration: December 2
Member Registration: December 3
General Registration: December 10


Early Bird Pricing Dec. 2 through Dec. 16:

  • $10 off one-session classes
  • $20 off classes that are two to six sessions
  • $35 off classes that are eight sessions or more

Early bird pricing will automatically apply at checkout. 

Filter Courses:

Page  1 of 3

Follow the Thread

All Levels | Develop work along a through-line or theme in this generative workshop aimed at getting you closer to manuscript creation. Students should come with a selection of work to tie together and a theme to develop through further…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Amber Flame

View Details

Start Date: 01/23/2020 – 5:00 pm

Amber Flame

Amber Flame is a writer, composer, and performer whose work has garnered residencies with Hedgebrook, The Watering Hole, Vermont Studio Center, and YEFE NOF. Flame’s original work has been published in diverse arenas, including Def Jam Poetry, Winter Tangerine, The Dialogist, Split This Rock, Black Heart Magazine, Sundress Publications, FreezeRay, Redivider Journal, and more. A 2016 Pushcart Prize nominee, Jack Straw Writer, and recipient of the CityArtist grant from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs, Amber Flame’s first full-length poetry collection, Ordinary Cruelty, was recently published through Write Bloody Press. Amber Flame is a queer Black single mama just one magic trick away from growing her unicorn horn.

See current classes >

Writing Our Obsessions

All Levels | Our writing is inspired, in part, by our obsessions—those images, memories and concerns we keep spinning in our heads. We will explore ways modern and contemporary poets and writers effectively write their obsessions, considering the relationship of…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Carolyne Wright

View Details

Start Date: 01/25/2020 – 10:00 am

Carolyne Wright

Carolyne Wright’s new book is This Dream the World: New & Selected Poems (Lost Horse Press, 2017), whose title poem received a Pushcart Prize and was included in The Best American Poetry 2009 and the Pushcart Prize XXXIV: Best of the Small Presses (2010). Her ground-breaking anthology, Raising Lilly Ledbetter: Women Poets Occupy the Workspace (Lost Horse, 2015), received ten Pushcart Prize nominations and was a finalist in the Foreword Review's Book of the Year Awards. Her nine earlier volumes of poetry include Seasons of Mangoes & Brainfire (Eastern Washington UP/Lynx House Books), which won the Blue Lynx Prize and the American Book Award; and A Change of Maps (Lost Horse Press), finalist for the Alice Fay di Castagnola Award and the Idaho Prize. A Seattle native who studied with Elizabeth Bishop, Richard Hugo, and William Stafford, among others, Wright lived in Chile and traveled in Brazil on a Fulbright Grant during the presidency of Salvador Allende; and spent four years on Fulbright and other fellowships in India and Bangladesh, translating Bengali women poets. She has five volumes of poetry in translation from Spanish and Bengali. A Contributing Editor for the Pushcart Prizes, a Senior Editor for Lost Horse Press, and an Advisory Board member for Raven Chronicles, Wright has received grants and fellowships from the NEA, 4Culture, Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture, and she will spend two months in Bahia, Brazil, on a writing residency at the Instituto Sacatar.

Photo by Brian Weiss

See current classes >

Comics: Taking it to the Next Level

Intermediate | You’ve written and drawn a few (or several) pages of comics, and now you’d like to take it further. Two expert cartoonists take you in new directions with a variety of challenging assignments and insightful lectures. You will…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: David Lasky, Greg Stump

View Details

Start Date: 01/25/2020 – 1:00 pm

David Lasky, Greg Stump

David Lasky has been a published comics artist since 1989. His earliest success was a nine page mini-adaptation of James Joyce’s Ulysses (self-published), which was reviewed in the Washington Post’s “Bookworld” section in 1992. In the 90’s he became known for the solo comic Boom Boom, and then collaborated with Greg Stump on the Harvey-nominated Urban Hipster. With writer Frank Young, he co-created two graphic novels: Oregon Trail: Road to Destiny and The Carter Family: Don’t Forget This Song (Abrams). Carter Family won an Eisner Award (the comics industry’s equivalent to the Oscar) in 2013, in the category of Best Reality-Based Graphic Novel. David has been a graphic novel instructor at Richard Hugo House, Coyote Central, and various other venues in the Seattle area.

Teaching Philosophy: Creating comics is a powerful communication skill that anyone can learn, no matter their drawing ability.

Writers I return to: Art Spiegelman, Robert Crumb, Stacey Levine, James Joyce.

Favorite writing advice: Don't wait to get permission from anyone to create, just do it. You'll figure things out as you go.

Greg Stump is a longtime contributor to The Stranger and a former writer and editor for The Comics Journal. His work in comics includes the weekly strip Dwarf Attack and the comic book series Urban Hipster, a co-creation with David Lasky that was nominated for a Harvey and Ignatz award. His graphic novel Disillusioned Illusions was published in 2015 by Fantagraphics Books. An adjunct lecturer at Seattle University and a writer-in-residence for Seattle Arts & Lectures, he has been teaching comics to students of all ages for close to two decades.

Past Student Feedback:
"I thought both David and Greg were awesome instructors. They made it a fun class."

See current classes >

Show and Tell

All Levels | Though many of us have heard the advice “show, don’t tell,” this workshop will embrace the practice of showing and telling. We will find answers to dilemmas such as when you should rely on just-the-facts-ma’am narrative and…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Beth Slattery

View Details

Start Date: 01/28/2020 – 5:00 pm

Beth Slattery

Beth Slattery moved to Seattle after eighteen years of teaching creative writing and literature at Indiana University East. Since her relocation, she has been writing and editing. Beth is currently working on a collection of personal essays about her mid-life marriage to a Zimbabwean, a move from the Midwest to the Pacific Northwest, and a reluctant acceptance of the call to adventure. Her most recent publications appear in Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies and Southern Women’s Review. Beth’s recent editing work includes being a “beta” reader for an author with a multi-book publishing contract, content and copy editing of a personal essay collection, and providing comprehensive editing services on an edited academic volume that was later published by Oxford University Press. She has an M.A. in fiction writing from Miami University and an M.F.A. in creative nonfiction from the University of Southern Maine—Stonecoast.

See current classes >

Philosophy for Writers Part III

Philosophy for Writers Part III is for any writers regardless of previous enrollment in a Philosophy for Writers course. In this class, we will enter philosophy from a path that starts with Adam Smith’s The Theory of Moral Sentiments and…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Charles Tonderai Mudede

View Details

Start Date: 01/28/2020 – 7:10 pm
1 seats available

Charles Tonderai Mudede

Charles Tonderai Mudede is a Zimbabwean-born writer, filmmaker, and cultural critic. He writes about film, books, music, crime, art, economics, and urban theory for The Stranger. Mudede has made three films, two of which, Police Beat and Zoo, premiered at Sundance, and one, Zoo, was screened at Cannes. Mudede has written for the New York Times, Arcade Journal, Cinema Scope, Ars Electronica, The Village Voice, Radical Urban Theory, and C Theory. Mudede is also on the editorial board for the Black Scholar, which is based at the University of Washington, and between 1999 and 2005, lectured on post-colonial theory at Pacific Lutheran University, and in 2003 published a short book, Last Seen, with Diana George. Mudede has lived in Seattle since 1989.

See current classes >

Narrative Reclamation: Using Stories to Heal from Trauma

All Levels | This class is dedicated to the role of storytelling in finding relief from distress. Students in this course will learn how storytelling can be used for personal and communal reclamation, including the confrontation of historical pain. Students…

Course Type: 2 Sessions  |   Instructor: Zain Shamoon

View Details

Start Date: 02/01/2020 – 10:00 am

Zain Shamoon

Dr. Zain Shamoon completed his PhD in Human Development and Family Studies in Fall 2017 at Michigan State University. He also completed a Master's degree in Couple and Family therapy in 2011. He is dedicated to the creation of spaces where people can tell their personal stories on route to their own wellness. In his clinical work, he has served a range of clients, including those wrestling with high anxiety, relational conflict, and severe depression.

In March 2015, he helped launch the Narratives of Pain project, which is a group emotional outlet of personal narrative and catharsis based in Metro Detroit, and now Seattle. Currently, Zain is a professor of Couple and Family Therapy at Antioch University Seattle.

See current classes >

How the Body Holds Its Stories: An Embodied Writing Workshop

All Levels | How do our bodies hold on to experiences? In this course, writers will come together to consider the physical act of writing—how we translate embodied knowledge into language on the page. By moving our bodies and engaging…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Jordan Alam

View Details

Start Date: 02/01/2020 – 10:00 am
This class is full

Jordan Alam

Jordan Alam is a queer Bangladeshi-American writer, performer, and social change educator based out of Seattle. Their work engages with moments of rupture and transformation in the lives of people on the margins. Jordan has performed on stage and facilitated workshops nationwide, most recently at Town Hall Seattle. Their short stories and articles have been published in The Atlantic, CultureStrike Magazine, The Rumpus, and AAWW’s The Margins among others. They are currently writing a debut novel which explores intergenerational trauma, Bengali folklore, and borders – both literal and metaphorical. Learn more about their work at their website: www.jordanalam.com.

See current classes >

Online Class | From History to Story: Writing Your Life

Introductory / Intermediate | You’ve got a life story to tell, but how can you turn history into a story? What should you include? And what should you leave out? Moreover, how can you make your memories interesting to a…

Course Type: 8 Sessions  |   Instructor: Susan Meyers

View Details

Start Date: 02/04/2020
4 seats available

Susan Meyers

Susan V. Meyers has lived and taught in Chile, Costa Rica, and Mexico. She earned an MFA from the University of Minnesota and a PhD from the University of Arizona, and she currently directs the Creative Writing Program at Seattle University. Her fiction and nonfiction have been supported by grants from the Fulbright foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, 4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, as well as several artists residencies. Her novel Failing the Trapeze won the Nilsen Award for a First Novel and the Fiction Attic Press Award for a First Novel, and it was a finalist for the New American Fiction Award. Other work has recently appeared in Per Contra, Calyx, Dogwood, The Portland Review, and The Minnesota Review, and it has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

See current classes >

Graph & Photograph

This workshop will engage the braid of two kinds of writing. While one happens in language, the other, photography, is wordless—“writing with light.” Each participant will compose an original piece of writing in dialogue with a photo, which may be…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Andrew Zawacki

View Details

Start Date: 02/04/2020 – 1:00 pm

Andrew Zawacki

A 2015-16 Howard Foundation Fellow in Poetry, Andrew Zawacki is the author of five poetry books: Unsun : f/11 (Coach House, 2019); Videotape (Counterpath, 2013); Petals of Zero Petals of One (Talisman House,
2009); Anabranch (Wesleyan, 2004); and By Reason of Breakings (Georgia,
2002). A former Rhodes Scholar and Fulbright Scholar, he earned his doctorate from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.
Zawacki has also published four books in France: Sonnetssonnants, translated by Anne Portugal; Georgia and Carnet Bartleby, both translated by Sika Fakambi; and Par Raison de brisants, translated by Antoine Cazé and a finalist for the Prix Nelly Sachs. Anabranche, translated by Sika Fakambi, is forthcoming from Éditions Grèges.
His chapbook Georgia was co-winner of the 1913 Prize, while Masquerade won the Alice Fay DiCastagnola Award from the Poetry Society of America. Arrow’s shadow was issued by Equipage in the UK, and Kaeshi-waza was published in Canada by The Elephants. More recently, Sonnensonnets appeared from Tammy, Waterfall plot from Greying Ghost.
His work has appeared in Poems for Political Disaster, Legitimate Dangers:
American Poets of the New Century, The Iowa Anthology of New American
Poetries, Great American Prose Poems, The Eloquent Poem, and other
anthologies, as well as magazines such as The New Yorker, The Nation,
and The New Republic.
A past fellow of the Slovenian Writers’ Association, Zawacki edited Afterwards (White Pine, 1999), an anthology of postwar Slovenian poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, in addition to editing and co-translating Aleš Debeljak’s new and selected poems, Without Anesthesia (Persea, 2011), assisted by a Slovenian Ministry of Culture Translation Grant. His translations of two poetry books by Sébastien Smirou, See About (La Presse / Fence, 2017) and My Lorenzo (Burning Deck, 2012), have earned him a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship, a French Voices Grant, and a grant from the Centre National du Livre.
He coedited the late expatriate writer Gustaf Sobin’s collected poems and serves as co-executor of Sobin’s literary estate. Zawacki has published criticism in the TLS, Boston Review, Chicago Review, How2, Jacket2, New German Critique, and elsewhere. He has held fellowships from the Salzburg Seminar, the Bogliasco Foundation, la Résidence Internationale aux Récollets, le Collège International des Traducteurs Littéraires, Hawthornden Castle, Le Château de Lavigny, and the Millay Colony, Saltonstall Foundation, and Bread Loaf.

See current classes >

Creative Storytelling through Songwriting

All Levels | Not so different from a poem or short narrative, songwriting is simply storytelling with a musical backdrop. Songs share intimate tales of heartbreak, joy, rage, triumph, and defeat; understanding how to write them adds a useful skill…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Sassy Black

View Details

Start Date: 02/10/2020 – 5:00 pm

Sassy Black

A graduate of Cornish College of the Arts, SassyBlack, who first started performing in clubs at 18, hit the public consciousness in 2008 with her hip-hop duo, THEESatisfaction, releasing two records on Sub Pop. Since, she has fostered a solo career, writing and producing all of her music and releasing 11 projects since 2015. With melodies often compared to Herbie Hancock and a voice often compared to Sarah Vaughan, Black has received acclaim from myriad publications, including Pitchfork, Noisey, Afropunk, SPIN, and Essence.

With the gravity of a celestial body the gods themselves would fawn over, the artist will release her next record, Ancient Mahogany Gold, fall of 2019. Black, who has shared stages with performers like Princess Nokia and Charles Bradley, has played popular summer festivals like Capitol Hill Block Party and SXSW. And along with her music, which has been featured on the Adult Swim compilation, LUXE, her acting prowess has been featured on the HBO series, Vinyl, and Comedy Central’s Broad City. In short, she’s a modern day creative oracle.

See current classes >

Speak Beauty to Power

Earth calls for testimony, but not stridency. In poetry and episodic prose, we will forge testimony to protect places we love, and sustain the planet, with utterance kin to natural beauty. As a river testifies, so shall we—flow, light, grace….

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Kim Stafford

View Details

Start Date: 02/15/2020 – 10:00 am
5 seats available

Kim Stafford

Kim Stafford is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose, most recently Wild Honey, Tough Salt (Red Hen Press). In 2018 he was named Oregon's Poet Laureate by Governor Kate Brown. He teaches writing at Lewis & Clark College, at Fishtrap, and at the Sitka Center.

See current classes >

Wounded Little Liars: Characters in Fiction and Nonfiction

All Levels | These people in your stories… Who hurt them? Who loved them once and left them? What are your characters doing to their world and themselves because of their wounds? In this one-day deep-dive into your characters’ truths…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Sonora Jha

View Details

Start Date: 02/15/2020 – 1:00 pm

Sonora Jha

Sonora Jha is the author of the novel Foreign, published in 2013 by Random House India. She is a professor of journalism and media studies at Seattle University. Formerly a journalist in India and Singapore, her recent political essays and Op-Eds have been published in the New York Times, the Seattle Times, Seattle Weekly and the Globalist. Apart from her academic and journalistic writing, she is currently finishing work on a memoir. Sonora is a 2016-2018 Hugo House Writer-in-Residence.

See current classes >

The Art of Subtext

All Levels | Charles Baxter claims that the greatest fallacy of modern storytelling is that everyone is always listening to each other. In truth, we’re distracted, caught up in our own lives, and in general quite terrible at listening and…

Course Type: 4 Sessions  |   Instructor: Piper Lane

View Details

Start Date: 02/16/2020 – 1:00 pm

Piper Lane

Piper Lane holds an MFA from the University of Washington and an MA from Ohio University. She coordinated the reading series Castalia, cofounded the Black Jaw Lit Series, and served as prose editor for the Seattle Review. She teaches creative writing at UW. She won UW’s Eugene Van Buren award for fiction and Ohio University’s LitFest Nonfiction essay contest.

See current classes >

Morrison, Lorde, and Shange: Poetry, Place, and Protest Across Generations and Genres

All Levels | We will critically read, intensely discuss, unpack and explore the masterful words and the social and literary impact of Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and Ntozake Shange. You’ll create a collection of three pieces of mixed-genre work using…

Course Type: 6 Sessions  |   Instructor: Anastacia Renee

View Details

Start Date: 02/18/2020 – 7:10 pm

Anastacia Renee

Anastacia-Renee is a multi-genre writer, educator, and interdisciplinary artist. She is the recipient of the 2018 James W. Ray Distinguished Artist Award for Washington artists (Artist Trust), and has served as the 2017-2019 Seattle Civic Poet and the 2015-2017 poet-in-residence at Hugo House. Anastacia-Renee is a two-time Pushcart nominee and 2017 Artist of Year (Seattle). She is the author of five books: Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.) (Black Ocean) 26 (Dancing Girl Press), Kiss Me Doll Face (Gramma Press), and Answer(Me) (Winged City Chapbooks, Argus Press) and has received writing fellowships and residencies from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Artist Trust, Jack Straw, Ragdale, Whiteley, Mineral School, and Hypatia in the Woods. Her cross-genre writing has appeared in a TEDx talk; the anthologies Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism, Sinister Wisdom: Black Lesbians—We Are the Revolution, and Revise the Psalm: Work Celebrating the Writing of Gwendolyn Brooks; and Ms. Magazine, Split this Rock, Painted Bride Quarterly, Crab Creek Review, Seattle Review, The Fight & the Fiddle, Duende, Poetry Northwest, Synaethesia, Banqueted, Torch, Mom Egg Review, The Magazine of Glamorous Refusal, Pinwheel Journal, and many more. She teaches poetry and multi-genre workshops at Hugo House, libraries, universities, and high schools.

See current classes >

Fall Back in Love with Your Writing

Acclaimed author Courtney Maum will teach writers how to reengage with texts they’ve fallen out of love with or are simply struggling to complete. Whether you are stuck in the mucky middle of a first novel draft, can’t find the…

Course Type: 1 Session  |   Instructor: Courtney Maum

View Details

Start Date: 02/19/2020 – 1:00 pm
This class is full

Courtney Maum

Courtney Maum is the author of the novels Costalegre, Touch, and I Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You and the chapbook Notes from Mexico. Her writing and essays have been widely published in such outlets as BuzzFeed, The New York Times, O, The Oprah Magazine, Interview, and Modern Loss. She is the founder of the learning collaborative The Cabins, and she also works as a product namer and publishing consultant from her home in Connecticut. Find out more at courtneymaum.com.

See current classes >

Page  1 of 3